South Dakota Legislative Lingo Explained

What does it mean when a bill is hog housed, smoked out, or sent to the 41st legislative day?

We are breaking down what some of the most commonly used legislative jargon means and perhaps how you can work it into your daily discussions on local politics.

Hoghouse

  • This is a procedure occasionally used in the Legislature when a committee or a member from the floor, will move to strike everything after enacting clause of a bill and insert in lieu thereof the substance of an entirely new bill.

Smoke Out

  • An act which invokes of Joint Rule 7-7 whereby one-third of the members of a house can require a committee to deliver a bill to the full body by the next legislative day.

Sent to the 41st Legislative Day

  • An act to send a bill to the day after the last day of the Legislative Session for discussion, ultimately defeating the bill.

Proponent

  • Someone who is supportive of a particular piece of legislation or act.

Opponent

  • Someone who is against a particular piece of legislation or act.

Lame Duck

  • An official in the final period of office, or after the election of a successor.

 

This list is not entirely exhaustive of terminology you may encounter during the South Dakota Legislative Session. Please take a look here, for more, or email us at southdakota@aclu.org with questions.

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